Signed, Sealed, Delivered

I used to think that getting organic vegetables delivered made you a twat, that only a certain kind of person from Chiswick might indulge in such a luxury. I also used to think that straight blonde hair and a denim mini was the height of chic – you live, you learn.

The fact is though, that locally grown produce, with minimal packaging and need for transport is not only much better for the environment, but also fresher and more flavoursome (a carrot almost straight from the ground is always going to beat one that’s been in Tesco’s production line for at least a week). So, when a local cafe owner started moonlighting with vegetable boxes earlier this year, I took the opportunity to re-think my former opinions and I’m glad I did.

Browns have since stopped doing vegetables to concentrate on their excellent coffee and baked good selection and I have been getting happily getting a box every other week from Riverford. Their selection is always varied, well priced and their easy to use website makes it easy to alter and add to orders as you feel like it.

Having been converted to the ways of the fancy delivered vegetable, when luxury online food company Natoora offered to let me sample their one of their vegetable boxes, I jumped at the chance. If Riverford are like your local shop, Natoora is like Harrods, and as such the box contained the finest Italian basil, sweet juicy strawberries from Sicily, the freshest of Jersey Royals and a sizable bunch of BOS (bang-on-season, obv, or Scouse for good if you like) asparagus.

Of course sourcing some of the ingredients overseas does knock the air-mile brownie points on the head, but as a special, getting the best-in-the-world-version treat, it’s OK now and again. Natoora seems a smallish company, so it’s hardly the same as a large supermarket shipping tonnes of veg that you can grow here accross the world.

I might sound like a broken record, but the simplest of food, made with high quality ingredients is the best, but a basic pasta dish made with the cherry tomatoes and basil from the Natoora box, with just a drizzle of nice olive oil was something special and true testament to that.

I promise I am not just praising it because it was free either. I have been really impressed with the boxes from Riverford (that I pay for) and didn’t expect to see much difference in Natoora’s wares, but the vegetables I received were of really high quality, and tasted great. Of course, being sourced further afield, and being at a much higher price-point than a standard vegetable delivery company, Natoora would never replace my normal fortnightly food order, but for a special treat, or particular meal, if I didn’t have time to go from butchers to farmers market and the likes, I would not hesitate to order their vegetables and various other fancy/specialist food in future.

Natoora taster vegetable selection pictured.

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4 Responses to “Signed, Sealed, Delivered”

  1. Wild Hop Risotto « Feast on Scraps Says:

    […] Feast on Scraps Kitchen experiments that will neither bankrupt you or give you a heart attack, alongside a guide to cheap eats and hidden gems around London (with an SE sway). No 'noms'. No cupcakes. No wanking into a plate of foie gras. « Signed, Sealed, Delivered […]

  2. Lizzie Says:

    It makes me wince a bit that they sent you strawberries from Sicily when our own English ones are in season.

  3. Katherine Natoora Says:

    What a lovely post thanks Laura! And Lizzie, now our fantastic British strawberries are in season we are selling them too as well as the best of French and Italian varieties. We really do love strawberries!

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